A Labor Law Compliance Notice in Florida is a notice that employers must display in the workplace that informs employees of their rights and protections under state and federal labor laws. The notice typically includes information about minimum wage, overtime pay, child labor, anti-discrimination, and whistleblower protection laws.

In Florida, employers are required to display the notice in a conspicuous location where it can be easily seen by employees. This includes posting the information in the break room, lunch room, or other common areas where employees gather. Employers are also required to provide employees with a copy of the notice upon hire.

The Florida Minimum Wage Act, Florida Child Labor Law, Florida Fair Labor Standards Act, Florida Civil Rights Act, and Florida Whistleblower’s Act are some of the most important labor laws that employers are required to comply with in Florida.

These laws provide protections to employees in areas such as wages, working hours, discrimination, and retaliation. Employers who fail to comply with these laws can face penalties, fines, and lawsuits from employees.

Labor Laws Covered in a Labor Law Compliance Notice in Florida

1. The Florida Minimum Wage Act

The Florida Minimum Wage Act is a state law that establishes the minimum wage that employers must pay to employees for their work. The minimum wage in Florida is currently $8.65 per hour, which is higher than the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour.

The Florida Minimum Wage Act also provides for automatic increases in the minimum wage each year based on the cost of living. This means that the minimum wage may increase each year to keep up with inflation.

The law applies to all employers and employees in the state of Florida, with a few exceptions. For example, certain types of employees, such as tipped employees, may be paid a lower minimum wage. Additionally, employees who are exempt from the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), such as certain types of executives and professionals, may also be exempt from the Florida Minimum Wage Act.

Employers who violate the Florida Minimum Wage Act can be subject to penalties, including fines and back pay for affected employees. Employees who believe they have not been paid the appropriate minimum wage can file a complaint with the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO).

It is important to note that some municipalities in Florida may have their own minimum wage laws that require employers to pay a higher wage than the state law requires. Employers must comply with the law that provides the highest wage for their employees.

2. The Florida Child Labor Law

The Florida Child Labor Law is a state law that sets standards for the employment of minors, including restrictions on the types of work that minors can perform, as well as the hours and conditions under which they may work. This law applies to all employers and employees in Florida under 18 years of age.

The Florida Child Labor Law sets certain restrictions on the types of work that minors can perform, such as hazardous occupations and jobs that require the operation of heavy machinery. Minors are also prohibited from working in certain industries, such as mining and logging, as well as in any work that is considered to be harmful to their health or well-being.

The law also sets limits on the number of hours that minors can work per day and per week. For example, minors under 16 years of age can only work 3 hours per day on a school day, 8 hours per day on a non-school day, and 18 hours per week when school is in session. Minors between 16-17 years of age have different limits, they can work 8 hours per day and 40 hours per week.

In addition, the Florida Child Labor Law requires employers to provide certain working conditions for minors, such as regular breaks and adequate supervision. Employers are also required to keep accurate records of the hours worked by minors and must provide them with a certificate of age.

Employers who violate the Florida Child Labor Law can be subject to penalties, including fines and back pay for affected employees. Employees who believe they have not been paid the appropriate minimum wage can file a complaint with the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO).

3. The Florida Fair Labor Standards Act

The Florida Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) is a state law that establishes standards for overtime pay, record keeping, and other aspects of wage and hour laws. This law applies to all employers and employees in the state of Florida, with a few exceptions.

The FLSA requires employers to pay non-exempt employees time-and-a-half for any hours worked over 40 hours in a workweek. Employers are also required to keep accurate records of the hours worked by employees and the wages paid to them.

The FLSA also prohibits employers from retaliating against employees who file a complaint or cooperate in an investigation related to wage and hour violations. Employees who believe they have been paid less than the minimum wage or have not been paid overtime can file a complaint with the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO) or the US Department of Labor (DOL).

4. The Florida Civil Rights Act

The Florida Civil Rights Act (FCRA) is a state law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of certain protected characteristics, such as race, color, nationality, sex, pregnancy, age, religion, disability, and genetic information. The law applies to employers, landlords, and other entities covered by federal civil rights laws, such as Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

The FCRA prohibits discrimination in areas such as hiring, firing, promotions, pay, and other terms and conditions of employment. It also prohibits discrimination in housing, public accommodations, and credit.

Employees, tenants, or customers who believe they have been discriminated against can file a complaint with the Florida Commission on Human Relations (FCHR) or the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). The FCHR investigates and resolves discrimination complaints related to employment and housing, and the EEOC investigates complaints related to federal laws such as Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

It is important to note that the FCRA provides the same protections as federal laws, but it also includes additional protected classes such as pregnancy, genetic information, and sexual orientation, which are not protected under federal laws.

5. The Florida Whistleblower’s Act

The Florida Whistleblower’s Act (FWA) is a state law that provides protection for employees who report illegal or unethical conduct by their employers. The law applies to all public and private employers in Florida, and it covers employees, former employees, and applicants for employment.

The FWA prohibits employers from retaliating against employees who report, or participate in an investigation of, illegal or unethical conduct by the employer. This includes conduct such as fraud, waste, abuse, or violations of state or federal laws.

Under the FWA, an employee who believes they have been retaliated against for reporting illegal or unethical conduct can file a complaint with the Florida Commission on Human Relations (FCHR). The FCHR will investigate the complaint and may order the employer to take certain actions, such as reinstating the employee or paying back pay.

The FWA also provides a private right of action for employees who are retaliated against, which means that employees can file a lawsuit against their employer in state court.

It is important to note that the FWA does not protect employees who make false or malicious reports, or who report conduct that is not illegal or unethical.