A moving violation in Florida refers to any infraction of traffic laws committed while a vehicle is in motion. These can include speeding, running a red light or stop sign, improper lane changes, and many other offenses.

It is important to note that certain moving violations in Florida can also result in increased insurance rates. This is because insurance companies view traffic violations as indicators of risky driving behavior. A single moving violation can cause your insurance rates to increase by hundreds of dollars over the course of a year.

Moving Violation in Florida

  1. Speeding

Speeding as a moving violation in Florida refers to the act of driving faster than the posted speed limit or the speed that is reasonable and prudent under the current conditions.

According to Florida state law, drivers must obey posted speed limit signs, and when there is no speed limit sign, the maximum speed limit is 60 mph on highways, 30 mph on urban residential streets, and 15 mph on school zones and other areas when children are present.

Speeding is considered a moving violation and can result in fines, points on your driver’s license, and even accidents that cause injuries or fatalities.

In some cases, excessive speeding or excessive speed in a construction zone can result in higher fines or even criminal charges. It is important to always obey posted speed limits and to adjust your speed to the current conditions of the road to avoid speeding and other moving violations.

  1. Running a Red Light or Stop Sign

Running a red light or stop sign as a moving violation in Florida refers to the act of failing to obey traffic signals or signs. According to Florida state law, drivers are required to come to a complete stop at red lights and stop signs, and to yield to other vehicles and pedestrians as appropriate.

Running a red light or stop sign can include, but is not limited to, failing to stop completely, rolling through a stop sign, and failing to yield to other vehicles or pedestrians.

  1. Improper Lane Changes

Improper lane changes as a moving violation in Florida refers to the act of changing lanes on the highway or roadways in a manner that is not in accordance with the state’s traffic laws. According to Florida state law, drivers are required to signal their intent to change lanes, check their mirrors and blind spot, and yield to any vehicles in the lane they are attempting to enter.

Improper lane changes can include but are not limited to, failing to signal, cutting off other drivers, and changing lanes without checking for other vehicles.

  1. Reckless Driving

Reckless driving as a moving violation in Florida refers to the act of operating a vehicle in a manner that shows a disregard for the safety of others.

According to Florida state law, reckless driving can include but is not limited to, excessive speeding, racing on the highway, weaving in and out of traffic, and ignoring traffic signals and signs. Reckless driving can cause serious accidents and injuries, and as such it’s considered a serious traffic violation.

Reckless driving is a criminal misdemeanor that can result in fines, points on your driver’s license, and even jail time. It can also lead to the suspension or revocation of your driver’s license, and an increase in insurance rates. It is important to always drive safely and within the laws and regulations of the state to avoid reckless driving and other moving violations.

  1. Tailgating

Tailgating is the act of following another vehicle too closely on the road. According to Florida state law, drivers are required to maintain a safe following distance from the vehicle in front of them, and failure to do so can result in a citation for tailgating.

 

This is considered a moving violation and may result in points on your driver’s license, fines, and possibly an increase in your insurance rates. It is considered a serious traffic violation that can cause accidents. It is important to always maintain a safe distance from the vehicle in front of you, to ensure the safety of yourself and other drivers on the road.

  1. Driving Under the Influence (DUI)

Driving Under the Influence (DUI) refers to operating a vehicle while under the influence of alcohol or drugs. In Florida, it is illegal to drive with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08% or higher. For commercial drivers, the limit is lower at 0.04%.

If a law enforcement officer suspects that a driver is under the influence, they may conduct a field sobriety test, which includes things like walking in a straight line or standing on one leg. They may also administer a breathalyzer test to determine the driver’s BAC.

If the driver’s BAC is found to be above the legal limit or if the officer has other evidence that the driver is under the influence, the driver may be arrested and charged with DUI. The penalties for a DUI conviction in Florida can be severe.

For a first-time offense, a driver may face up to six months in jail, a fine of up to $1,000, and a license suspension of up to one year.

The penalties increase for subsequent offenses, with a third offense resulting in a minimum of 30 days in jail, a fine of up to $5,000, and a license suspension of up to 10 years. Additionally, a DUI conviction may also result in increased insurance rates and the installation of an ignition interlock device (IID) on the driver’s vehicle.

It is important to note that in Florida, there are enhanced penalties for certain types of DUI offenses, such as those involving serious injury or death. Additionally, if a driver’s BAC is found to be 0.15% or higher, they may face enhanced penalties.

How to Avoid a Moving Violation in Florida

Obey Speed Limits

One of the most common moving violations in Florida is speeding. To avoid this violation, always obey posted speed limits and avoid speeding, even if you are running late.

Come to a Complete Stop at Stop Signs and Red Lights

Another common moving violation is running a red light or stop sign. To avoid this violation, make sure to come to a complete stop at all stop signs and traffic signals before proceeding.

Use Turn Signals When Changing Lanes

Improper Lane changes are also considered a moving violation. To avoid this violation, always use your turn signals when changing lanes, and make sure to do so in a safe and legal manner.

Avoid Reckless or Aggressive Behavior on the Road

Reckless driving, tailgating, and other forms of aggressive behavior on the road can also result in moving violations. To avoid these violations, always drive in a safe and responsible manner.

Keep Your Vehicle in Good Working Condition

Having faulty equipment on your vehicle, such as broken lights or worn brakes, can also result in moving violations. To avoid these violations, make sure to regularly maintain your vehicle and address any issues in a timely manner.

Avoid Distractions

Distracted driving is a major cause of accidents and moving violations, such as texting and driving, eating, changing the radio station, etc. To avoid these violations, avoid any type of distraction while driving.

Take a Defensive Driving Course

Taking a defensive driving course can help you learn to anticipate and avoid dangerous situations on the road, which can help reduce your risk of receiving a moving violation.

In conclusion,

If you receive a moving violation in Florida, it is important to take it seriously and take the necessary steps to resolve it. This may include paying fines, attending traffic school, or taking other steps to have the violation removed from your record. By following these tips and always obeying traffic laws, you can help reduce your risk of receiving a moving violation.