As we work through our week and head toward Friday, it’s a welcome end, for sure. But what if you’re asked or required to work beyond the usual 40 hours in a week? Indeed, extra money always comes in handy, but that’s assuming your employer understands and follows the wage and overtime laws. Otherwise, you…

 

20 hours or less per week is classified as part time and your employer will not be legally required to provide benefits by either state or federal law. Employment law and status can be confusing, especially to newer workers. Depending on where you are, various regulations, rules, and internal policies can determine your employment status,…

 

Florida law does not interfere with the number of hours employers can force salaried employees to work in the state. Unless a written agreement between the employer and employee states otherwise, an employer reserves the right under the FLSA to require an employee to work as many overtime hours as they want. It is not…

 

There are no very clear definitions of full-time or part-time in the State of Florida, but there are some thresholds you need to be conversant with. In Florida, full-time employment is noted as an individual working a workweek of 25 hours or more. However, this term is mostly reserved for insurance purposes. A good number…

 
 

No. There are no federal or Florida laws mandating holiday pay for employees, except for the employee who works on a holiday. A good number of employers in Florida use it as a benefit to attract and retain employees. Some employees also negotiate it as a condition of their employment. But aside from that, if…

 

Most often, mandatory overtime is legal in the state of Florida. Have it in mind that many employers in the state of Florida have the right to demand mandatory overtime from their employees. Howbeit, if you qualify for overtime pay, which many hourly workers do under federal and Florida wage and hour laws, you are…

 

Yes. A part-time salaried employee is an individual who works what their employer considers as part-time hours while also receiving a salary. A good number of employers in the United States consider part-time hours to be below 30-35 hours per week, although the company may stipulate a different number of hours. Salaried status simply entails…

 

No. The same way employers are not mandated to offer benefits to their full-time employees; part-time employees are not automatically granted benefits even if they work full time. According to the United States Department of Labor, the FLSA does not define full-time employment or part-time employment. This is a matter most often determined by the…

 

The secret that numerous employers are beginning to unearth is that part-time employees represent an underutilized resource. For those that have taken a long voluntary career break owing to maternity leave or caring for a loved one, part-time work offers a route back into employment. Some employers also require part-time staff to remain flexible, while…

 

Yes. It is illegal to not pay overtime to hourly, or non-exempt employees if they work more than 40 hours in a workweek. Even if your non-exempt employees work overtime without your approval, under federal law, you are still expected to pay them overtime rates for those hours. Have it in mind that not compensating…

 

Yes. If you qualify for unemployment benefits, you can work a part-time job and still collect benefits in the State of Florida. However, you will be expected to work less than full-time hours and earn less than your weekly benefit amount. Rather than collecting your full weekly benefit amount, you will have to collect a…

 
 

One reoccurring gaffe made by owners of small businesses is failing to compensate their tipped workers the accurate wage. Things can get tricky when it relates to reimbursing tipped workers for overtime. If you want to avoid liability and stay in compliance, you must understand how to determine overtime pay for tipped workers. Simply put,…

 

Most Florida employers offer meal or rest breaks, but you may be shocked to discover that neither the federal nor Florida act grants employees time off for lunch or the privilege of taking short breaks during the work day. Although no Florida legislation necessitates employers to provide meal and rest breaks, but the federal labor…